Physics Quiz

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Welcome to our Physics Quiz Challenge!

Are you ready to unravel the mysteries of the physical world?

Dive into our Free Online Physics Quiz and explore the fundamental principles that govern the universe. This interactive quiz is designed to captivate participants of all levels—from curious novices to passionate physics enthusiasts.

Discover intriguing concepts, solve thought-provoking problems, and gain valuable insights into the workings of the cosmos. It’s an engaging, enlightening experience, and best of all, it’s completely free!

Don’t miss out! Embark on your physics journey today and ignite your passion for understanding the forces that shape our reality!

Disclaimer: The hard questions in the Physics Quiz are challenging. To finish the game and reaching the master level typically requires a significant amount of grit, determination and perseverance. I you want to learn more about physics check out our article about Physics as a passion.

Question 1:

Which name is commonly associated with the theory of relativity in physics?

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This scientist is often depicted with wild hair.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Albert Einstein - Albert Einstein is renowned for his groundbreaking theory of relativity, which revolutionized the field of physics.

Question 2:

Which name is commonly associated with the theory of general relativity in physics?

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This scientist is also known for his famous equation E=mc^2.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Albert Einstein - Albert Einstein is renowned for his development of the theory of general relativity, which has had a profound impact on the field of physics.

Question 3:

Which physicist proposed a theoretical concept involving 'closed timelike curves' that could allow for time travel?

Click to see Hint ⬇
The physicist was involved in the movie 'Interstellar'.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Kip Thorne - Kip Thorne, a renowned physicist, proposed the theoretical concept involving 'closed timelike curves' that could potentially allow for time travel.

Question 4:

Which famous physicist proposed a twin paradox involving time dilation and the effects of traveling at near-light speeds?

Click to see Hint ⬇
The physicist is well-known for the theory of relativity.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Albert Einstein - Albert Einstein, the renowned physicist, proposed the twin paradox involving time dilation and the effects of traveling at near-light speeds.

Question 5:

Which popular toy is a colorful plastic spring that can travel down stairs and perform tricks?

Click to see Hint ⬇
This toy demonstrates the physics of waves.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Slinky - The Slinky is a toy precompressed helical spring invented by Richard James in the early 1940s.

Question 6:

Which of the following is a measure of the average speed of motion of the molecules of a substance?

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It's related to the kinetic energy of molecules.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Temperature - Higher temperatures indicate that the molecules are moving more rapidly, while lower temperatures indicate slower molecular motion.

Question 7:

What is the term for the process of rotating or turning around an axis?

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This process involves rotation around an axis.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Spinning - Spinning is the act of rotating or turning around an axis, often seen in various activities such as figure skating, gymnastics, and physics experiments.

Question 8:

What is the force that opposes the motion of objects through air or water?

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It is a force that slows down moving objects in fluids.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Drag - Drag is caused by the interaction and pressure difference between the fluid and the moving object, leading to resistance against the object's motion.

Question 9:

What is the unit of measurement for electrical resistance?

Click to see Hint ⬇
It is named after a physicist known for his work on electrical resistance.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Ohm - Ohm is the derived unit of electrical resistance in the International System of Units, named after the German physicist Georg Simon Ohm.

Question 10:

What is the phenomenon in which light is bent as it passes through a medium, such as air or water?

Click to see Hint ⬇
This phenomenon is responsible for the apparent bending of a pencil in a glass of water.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Refraction - Refraction occurs due to the change in speed of light as it moves from one medium to another, causing it to change direction.

Question 11:

Which of the following is a fundamental particle that carries the electromagnetic force and is responsible for mediating electromagnetic interactions?

Click to see Hint ⬇
They are the basic unit of all light.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Photon - Photons are the force carriers for the electromagnetic force and are responsible for all electromagnetic interactions.

Question 12:

What is the name for the process by which an unstable atomic nucleus loses energy by emitting radiation?

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Marie Curie's work was pivotal in understanding this phenomenon.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Radioactivity - Radioactive decay occurs in unstable atomic nuclei, leading to the emission of various types of radiation.

Question 13:

What is the closest star to Earth?

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Think about the stars closest to our solar system.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Proxima Centauri - Proxima Centauri is a red dwarf star located about 4.24 light-years from the Sun in the constellation of Centaurus.

Question 14:

What is the name of the force that keeps the planets in orbit around the Sun?

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Think about the force that makes objects fall to the ground.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Gravity - Gravity is the force of attraction between all masses in the universe, and it is responsible for keeping the planets in orbit around the Sun.

Question 15:

What is a group of stars that form a recognizable pattern called?

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Think about the patterns of stars in the night sky.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Constellation - Constellations are named after the shapes they resemble and are used for navigation and storytelling in many cultures.

Question 16:

What is the name of the theory that describes the origin of the universe as a rapid expansion from a hot, dense state?

Click to see Hint ⬇
Think about the widely accepted theory for the origin of the universe.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Big Bang Theory - The Big Bang Theory is the prevailing cosmological model for the observable universe from the earliest known periods through its subsequent large-scale evolution.

Question 17:

What is the name of the galaxy that contains our solar system?

Click to see Hint ⬇
Our galaxy's name is related to a popular candy bar.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Milky Way - The Milky Way galaxy is a barred spiral galaxy that contains our solar system.

Question 18:

What is a celestial body that orbits a planet called?

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It's the Earth's natural satellite.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Moon - Moons are natural satellites that orbit planets and dwarf planets.

Question 19:

What causes the phenomenon known as a shooting star?

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It's related to small space debris.
Click to see Answer ⬇
A meteoroid burning up in the atmosphere - Shooting stars, or meteors, are caused by small particles entering the Earth's atmosphere and burning up due to friction.

Question 20:

What is the name of the process by which a star produces energy?

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It involves combining light elements to form heavier ones.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Fusion - Fusion is the process by which stars convert hydrogen into helium, releasing energy in the process.

Question 21:

What is the name of the imaginary line that runs through the Earth's poles and is the axis around which the Earth rotates?

Click to see Hint ⬇
It is used for defining time zones.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Meridian - The Earth's meridian is an imaginary line that runs from the North Pole to the South Pole, passing through any point on the Earth's surface.

Question 22:

What is the name of the phenomenon where light from a celestial body is blocked by another body?

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This phenomenon can be observed during solar or lunar events.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Eclipse - An eclipse happens when a celestial body moves into the shadow of another, causing a temporary dimming or blocking of light.

Question 23:

What is the name of the process by which a star exhausts its nuclear fuel and collapses under its own gravity?

Click to see Hint ⬇
This event is one of the most energetic in the universe.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Supernova - When a star exhausts its nuclear fuel, it can collapse under its own gravity, leading to a supernova, a powerful explosion that can outshine entire galaxies.

Question 24:

What is the term for the point in a celestial body's orbit where it is farthest from the Sun?

Click to see Hint ⬇
This term is related to the orbital dynamics of celestial bodies.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Aphelion - Aphelion is the point in a celestial body's orbit where it is farthest from the Sun, while perihelion is the point where it is closest to the Sun.

Question 25:

What is the name of the process by which a black hole emits radiation and gradually loses mass?

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This phenomenon is named after a renowned physicist.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Hawking radiation - Hawking radiation is a theoretical process proposed by Stephen Hawking, where black holes emit radiation and gradually lose mass over very long periods of time.

Question 26:

What is the term for the point in the sky directly above an observer's head?

Click to see Hint ⬇
This term describes the highest point in the sky from a specific location.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Zenith - The zenith is the point in the sky directly above an observer, while the nadir is the point directly below. The meridian is the line passing through the zenith and connecting north and south points on the horizon.

Question 27:

What is the name of the boundary surrounding a black hole beyond which nothing can escape its gravitational pull?

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This boundary marks the point of no return for anything falling into a black hole.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Event horizon - The event horizon is a boundary in spacetime beyond which events cannot affect an outside observer. It is the point of no return for anything falling into a black hole.

Question 28:

Which type of celestial object is known for emitting intense bursts of X-rays and gamma rays?

Click to see Hint ⬇
These objects are powered by accretion onto supermassive black holes.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Quasar - Quasars are the extremely bright centers of distant galaxies, powered by supermassive black holes. They emit intense radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum, including X-rays and gamma rays.

Question 29:

What is the term for the hypothetical boundary around a black hole where gravity is so strong that nothing, not even light, can escape?

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This term defines the distance from the center of a black hole at which gravity becomes all-consuming.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Schwarzschild radius - The Schwarzschild radius is the distance from the center of a black hole at which the gravitational pull becomes so strong that nothing, not even light, can escape.

Question 30:

What is the name of the process by which a star collapses under its own gravity, leading to an explosive release of energy?

Click to see Hint ⬇
This process results in a brilliant burst of light and energy.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Supernova - A supernova is the cataclysmic explosion of a star, which can outshine an entire galaxy for a brief period of time.

Question 31:

What is the name of the process by which a massive star ends its life in a catastrophic collapse, leading to the formation of a black hole?

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This process occurs when a massive star undergoes a catastrophic collapse.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Black hole formation - The collapse of a massive star under its own gravity can result in the formation of a black hole, where the gravitational pull is so strong that nothing can escape.

Question 32:

Which of the following is a unit of measurement for the brightness of light?

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This unit is used to measure the brightness of light falling on a surface.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Lux - Lux measures the amount of light that falls on a given surface area. It is used to evaluate the amount of light present in a given space.

Question 33:

What is the ideal rebound height for a bungee jump?

Click to see Hint ⬇
Consider the physics of bungee jumping.
Click to see Answer ⬇
100% of the drop height - The rebound height refers to the maximum height reached by the jumper during the bounce back after the initial drop.

Question 34:

If a car travels at a speed of 60 miles per hour, how many miles will it travel in 3.5 hours?

Click to see Hint ⬇
Use the formula distance = speed × time.
Click to see Answer ⬇
210 miles - To find the distance, we multiply the speed (60 miles/hour) by the time (3.5 hours) to get 210 miles.

Question 35:

What is the SI unit for force?

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This unit is named after a famous physicist.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Newton - The Newton is defined as the force required to accelerate a one-kilogram mass by one meter per second squared.

Question 36:

Which of the following is a measure of an object's resistance to changes in motion?

Click to see Hint ⬇
This property is related to mass.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Inertia - Inertia is directly proportional to an object's mass, meaning the greater the mass, the greater the inertia.

Question 37:

Which of the following is a simple machine used to lift or move objects?

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It involves a system of ropes and wheels.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Pulley - Pulleys reduce the amount of force needed to lift heavy objects by distributing the load over multiple ropes or chains.

Question 38:

Which of the following is a measure of the force of gravity on an object?

Click to see Hint ⬇
This measurement can change in different gravitational fields.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Weight - Weight is directly proportional to an object's mass and the acceleration due to gravity.

Question 39:

Which of the following laws states that for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction?

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This law deals with interactions between objects.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Newton's Third Law - This law explains the principle behind propulsion systems, recoil, and many other physical phenomena.

Question 40:

What is the term for the force that opposes the relative motion or tendency of such motion of two surfaces in contact?

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It is the force that makes it difficult to slide objects across a surface.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Friction - Friction is the force that resists the relative motion or tendency of such motion of two surfaces in contact. It is caused by the irregularities of the surfaces and plays a crucial role in various mechanical systems.

Question 41:

What is the SI unit for work and energy?

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It is named after an English physicist.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Joule - The joule is the unit of work or energy in the International System of Units (SI). It is defined as the work done by a force of one newton acting over a distance of one meter.

Question 42:

What is the term for the point in a system where the potential energy is at a minimum?

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It is the state of minimum potential energy in a system.
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Equilibrium - In a physical system, equilibrium refers to a state where the net force and net torque on each particle are zero, and the potential energy is at a minimum. It is a stable state where the system tends to remain unless disturbed by an external force.

Question 43:

Which of the following is a measure of an object's resistance to rotational motion?

Click to see Hint ⬇
It is the rotational counterpart of mass in linear motion.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Inertia - Inertia is the resistance of any physical object to any change in its state of motion, including changes to its speed and direction. In rotational motion, it refers to the object's resistance to changes in its rotational state.

Question 44:

Which of the following is the SI unit for angular displacement?

Click to see Hint ⬇
It is defined as the angle subtended at the center of a circle by an arc whose length is equal to the radius of the circle.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Radian - The radian is the standard unit of angular measure, used in many areas of mathematics and physics. It represents the angle subtended by an arc of a circle that has the same length as the circle's radius.

Question 45:

Which famous physicist is known for doodling diagrams and equations, some of which have been preserved and studied by scholars?

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He was a brilliant physicist with a penchant for doodling complex scientific concepts.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Richard Feynman - Richard Feynman, a renowned physicist, is celebrated for his intricate doodles of physics concepts and equations.

Question 46:

Which famous physicist was known for doodling diagrams and equations, some of which have been preserved and studied by scholars?

Click to see Hint ⬇
This physicist was known for his contributions to quantum mechanics and the theory of quantum electrodynamics.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Richard Feynman - Richard Feynman, a Nobel Prize-winning physicist, was known for his habit of doodling diagrams and equations, some of which have been preserved and studied by scholars.

Question 47:

What is the term for the force that opposes the relative motion of an aircraft through the air?

Click to see Hint ⬇
It is one of the aerodynamic forces acting on an aircraft.
Click to see Answer ⬇
Drag - Reducing drag is important for improving fuel efficiency and maximizing aircraft performance.